hospitality business management Tag

RICHLAND, Wash. – Join Washington State University Tri-Cities for a social evening of exquisite wine and food on April 14 as part of the Crimson Food and Wine Classic at Hamilton Cellars and proceeds will go to the university’s hospitality business management and wine business management programs.

Crimson Food Classic at Hamilton CellarsThe evening will begin at 6 p.m. at Hamilton Cellars, 55410 N Sunset Rd. in Benton City, Washington, and will feature six Hamilton wines paired with dishes developed by WSU Pullman lead chef Jamie Callison and WSU students that integrate local and season tastes and flavors.

“It will be an excellent evening of examining and showcasing not only one of our region’s accomplished wineries, but also the hospitality and wine expertise of our WSU Tri-Cities students,” said Robert Harrington, academic director of the WSU Tri-Cities Carson College of Business. “It should be a fun night of food, wine and social networking, as well as an excellent opportunity to get to know some of our accomplished students.”

During the event, students will also present food pairings, manage the silent auction and interact with guests. An example pairing is house-smoked salmon bacon served with roasted Northwest beets, WSU Cougar Gold Cheese, blushing beet stems and paired with 2013 Hamilton Cellars, Weinbau Vineyard Cabernet Franc.Crimson Food and Wine Classic at Hamilton Cellars

“We are so excited to taste the food that Chef Jamie and his students are preparing to pair with our wines,” said Stacie Hamilton, one of the owners of Hamilton Cellars. “Chef Jamie is an amazing chef with an exquisite palate, so we are expecting a magical experience.”

The cost is $75 per person on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets may be purchased at

For more information, contact Deanne Pilkenton at 509-372-7264 or

By Maegan Murray

RICHLAND, Wash. – Organizations and private individuals from throughout the Columbia Basin joined together last month to support the future of regional business, but not in the traditional sense.

Ryan Leaf speaks as part of the Point to Success Brunch at Anthony's at Columbia Point in Richland

Ryan Leaf speaks as part of the Point to Success Brunch at Anthony’s at Columbia Point in Richland.

The dollars didn’t go toward supporting new up-and-coming businesses, building facade renovations, or promoting the next booming business product. Rather, the $36,695 raised at Point to Success brunch event will benefit the Washington State University Tri-Cities’ Carson College of Business. The college will use the funds to support classroom innovation, student academic services and career success activities, and faculty research.

In support of the event, Anthony’s at Columbia Point donated its entire restaurant space, a first-class meal and service for the mid-morning event that welcomed more than 100 people. Other businesses and individuals donated wine for a wine grab at the event, lavish vacation packages, rounds of golf and tours and tastings from local wineries, all of which were auctioned to benefit the Carson College.

McCurley Integrity Dealerships sponsored the appearance of Cougar football great Ryan Leaf at the brunch, who shared his inspiring story of overcoming years of drug abuse to now supporting others in the recovery process. The aspect of community, Leaf said, was crucial to his recovery.

Alaska Airlines, The Lodge at Columbia Point, Abadan, Hampton Inn Seattle Southcenter, NewEdge and Bonsai Audio also gave generously by making Leaf’s trip to the Tri-Cities and stay possible and by sponsoring the costs of the event programs, signage and sound equipment.

“The community support we have seen through the years is truly incredible, given the significant drop over the last decade of state funding that supports the University,” said Robert Harrington, director of the WSU Tri-Cities academic program. “Community support allows us to continue providing a premier education our students will use to provide first-class service in the business sector.”

It just makes sense

For Mike Tvedt, general manager of Anthony’s at Columbia Point, investing in the future of wine and hospitality business just makes sense. Investing in the

A chef cooks an entry that was served as part of the Point to Success Brunch at Anthony's at Columbia Point in Richland

A chef cooks an entry that was served as part of the Point to Success Brunch at Anthony’s at Columbia Point in Richland.

education of future business leaders, ensures students are well-prepared with premier business knowledge, research-driven business methods and a mindset for success, he said.

“The reason we got involved with the Carson College of Business was because of the hospitality program moving to WSU Tri-Cities a couple of years ago,” he said. “It goes back to the founder and owner of our company, Budd Gould, who believes it is important to give back to the community. It seemed like a natural fit that we would be involved with the program and do what we can to make it successful, because we are always in need of great hospitality employees.”

The Point to Success brunch isn’t the only way that Anthony’s has given back to a WSU Tri-Cities program, either. Anthony’s Restaurants own the next-door Budd’s Broiler, which holds the annual release party for the WSU Blended Learning wines. Through the Blended Learning program, wine science students partner with local wineries to produce premier wines. Budd’s Broiler donates the space, service and food for the event each year.

The family-owned-and-operated Anthony’s Restaurants are well-known across the Pacific Northwest for their first-class service, premier food and exceptional standards. But in order to continue that legacy, and even further improve upon their hospitality service, Tvedt said they must prepare those who will lead the business on into the future.

“We strive for five-star service and a five-star experience because that is what people expect,” Tvedt said. “We want to make sure that the future of our business is prepared and has the knowledge and know-how to meet those standards. WSU Tri-Cities is helping us meet that need.”

Impact on the community 

A Carson College Coug herself, Hamilton Cellars owner Stacie Hamilton said her WSU business education has benefited her own business success. In turn, she gives

Hamilton Cellars owners at WSU Tri-Cities Wine and Jazz event

Stacie Hamilton (right), one of the owners of Hamilton Cellars, has used her degree from the Carson of College of Business in her own business.

back to the WSU Tri-Cities business program, not only as a business owner, but also as an advisory member for the Carson College and as an adjunct faculty member at WSU Tri-Cities, because she knows the return will be tenfold for the local community.

In addition to giving monetarily to events like the Point to Success Brunch and donating Hamilton Cellars wine and products, Hamilton creates real-world learning opportunities for students at the winery.

“In addition to classroom education, WSU students require the real-world practical experience, which they get through internships, jobs in local business and generally through mentors in their business field,” she said. “They apply that combined knowledge to develop businesses of their own or grow established businesses. The reciprocity between the community and the university is special.”

Looking to the future

Harrington said the support the Carson College of Businesses has received from community

Robert Harrington (left) and Pauline Garza, a recent graduate of the Carson College of Business

Robert Harrington (left) and Pauline Garza, a recent graduate of the Carson College of Business. Garza is now the head chef at The Lodge at Columbia Point.

individuals and organizations will have an immediate and lasting impact on the future of businesses across the state.

“WSU’s business programs consistently rank among the top programs in the country, and the community support has been a crucial component,” he said. “We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without our community support.”

WSU’s hospitality business program, specifically, ranks eighth in the nation among all programs, nationwide. Harrington said the Tri-Cities-based program, being in the heart of Washington wine country, has the potential to grow immensely and be a huge treasure for the regional business community.

“We strive for excellence across the board, and it shows in our graduates,” he said. “We aim to produce the best business graduates so that our community and their businesses may benefit.”

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

Paul Skilton is the first professor from Washington State University Tri-Cities to participate in a teaching abroad experience with a prestigious business school in Brig, Switzerland.

WSU partners with the César Ritz Colleges in Switzerland to offer a dual degree program in hospitality business where students receive a degree from both César Ritz and WSU upon completion of the program. Through the years, professors from WSU have rotated to teach at the Swiss institution each semester. Since the hospitality business management program is fairly new to WSU Tri-Cities, the opportunity was not available for Tri-Cities professors until this year. The hospitality business management program began at WSU Tri-Cities in 2015.

Stockalper Palace in Brig, Switzerland

Stockalper Palace in Brig, Switzerland / Photo by Hansueli Krapf

César Ritz is a renowned school in the hospitality business management sector, ranking 24th in the world for hospitality and hotel management schools in 2016-16 by CEOWORLD Magazine and falling closely behind WSU, who ranked 21st in the world the same year by the publication.

“César Ritz prepares students who want to go into the hotel industry and all the fields that encompass that industry, from hospitality to restaurant and food service,” Skilton said. “Students from all over the world come to this school to study. The WSU Carson College of Business sends one faculty member each semester. I’m going this fall and Dr. Donna Paul will go in the spring.”

Skilton said the experience benefits both students abroad and students from WSU, in addition to allowing WSU professors to establish international connections with students and faculty from all over the world. WSU students, he said, may choose to study abroad for a semester at the Swiss school, broadening their scope of the hospitality industry and giving them that international experience that is crucial to their credentials in the field. The experience also opens doors for students overseas to come and study on campus at WSU, in addition to their experience on campus in Switzerland.

“The idea is that students will get a look at international contexts, contacts and points of view within the hospitality business world,” Skilton said. “If you are going to go into the hospitality business sector, you should be able to understand people who are different from you so that you can accommodate them accordingly. That international experience is very important.”

This semester, Skilton will teach a course focusing on management of innovation and change, as well as a principles of management course. He said he is most excited about learning as much from the faculty and students at the school as he is able to teach them.

“The faculty at César Ritz have a very different mindset,” Skilton said. “WSU is a research-based school whereas the faculty at César Ritz mostly consist of hotel professionals. It’s also a European college, so it’s going to be very different. I’m excited to learn about how they structure their programs and I hope they’ll teach me as much as I am able to teach them.”

Skilton leaves for Switzerland this month and will begin teaching at César Ritz in early October. He will return to WSU Tri-Cities in time for the spring semester this academic year.

The partnership program is one of WSU Carson College of Business’ longest-standing global partnerships and is in line with WSU’s Drive to 25.

For more information about the program and how WSU students can spend a semester abroad at with Cesar Ritz, visit

RICHLAND, Wash. – A recent study conducted by a Washington State University Tri-Cities faculty member indicates that holding at least one internationally-recognized wine credential could have a positive correlation on the number of social media followers a wine blogger may have.

Bottles of WSU Blended Learning wine

Bottles of Blended Learning wine made by students in WSU’s viticulture and enology program.

The results of the survey were published recently in the International Journal of Hospitality Beverage Management.

Byron Marlowe, a clinical assistant professor of hospitality and wine business management in WSU Tri-Cities’ Carson College of Business, surveyed 30 prominent wine bloggers with Twitter accounts. During a 45-day period, he tracked the number of Twitter followers they had, whether they posted about and recommended international wine destinations on their account and the wine credentials they listed. The bloggers selected for the survey had a minimum requirement of 500 Twitter followers.

The analysis indicated that wine bloggers with at least one credential from the nationally or globally-respected certifying bodies for wine credentialing had an average of 75 percent more followers than those without certifications. Those certifying bodies included: The Court of Master Sommeliers, Wine and Spirits Education Trust, Society of Wine Educators, Culinary Institute of America, International Sommelier Guiled, Sommelier Society of America and the International Wine Guild.

“The wine bloggers who went through the certification process received knowledge and expertise that make their recommendations inherently more meaningful, even if their followers did not know of their certifications,” Marlowe said.

The survey also showed that bloggers with higher credentials were more likely to recommend an international destination for wine consumption or purchase. Marlowe said bloggers that didn’t have certifications may simply not have had the international experience to review those types of wine or the regions from which those wines were created.

“A wine blogger without a certification may not have visited or studied in Burgundy, France, for example, because they didn’t have knowledge of the region or the need to be there to pass an exam for their certification,” he said. “So they wouldn’t have the background or motivation to recommend that destination or wine region.”

Grapes being crushed at the WSU wine science center

Grapes are pressed for winemaking at the Ste. Michelle Wine Estates WSU Wine Science Center at WSU Tri-Cities.

As a result of the survey, Marlowe recommends wine bloggers consider obtaining established certifications to heighten their credibility, and as a result, help potentially increase their number of followers on social media platforms and increase their brand reach.

WSU conducts a one-year wine business management certificate program for those looking to expand their knowledge of the industry. The certificate consists of six modules offered in an online format and requires two weekend experiences in Washington wine country. These weekend experiences provide students with an opportunity to network and learn with wine industry professionals, faculty and fellow students about the business of wine.

For more information on WSU’s wine business management certificate program, visit

Marlowe’s research is in line with WSU’s Grand Challenges, a suite of research initiatives aimed at large societal issues. It is particularly relevant to the challenge of sustaining resources with respect to food production and related business.