Master’s in Teaching

Inquiry and Stewardship

The Master in Teaching (MIT) program allows students to concurrently pursue a master’s degree and an elementary or secondary teaching certificate. WSU provides certification (endorsements) for individuals to teach either at the elementary level (K-8) or in certain subject areas at the secondary level (5-12).

The MIT program is cohort-based, forming a supportive network. The program consists of a wide range of pedagogy course work. Depending on the student’s focus (elementary or secondary education), these courses may include literacy, social studies, science, math, reading, health, fitness, or fine arts methods. Students also study diversity in schools and society, educational technology, the social context of education, and research-based effective practices. When successfully completed, the MIT program results in a master’s degree and teacher certification. Therefore, all MIT students complete both certification and graduate research courses.

About our programs

The following is a basic overview of our programs Elementary Education (Grades K-8) and Secondary Education (Grades 5-12), admission requirements, and application process.

Elementary Education (Grades K-8)

Admission requirements

+ Completion of a Bachelor degree at an accredited institution

+ 3.0 GPA or higher as calculated by the Graduate School

+ Demonstration of Basic Skills in reading, writing, and math.

All MIT candidates must attempt the WEST-B exams (reading, writing, and math) or an equivalent test (SAT or ACT) and report an official score prior to admission to the program. If they do not achieve the passing score in any (or all) sections, they may opt to take the test again or request an alternative means of demonstrating of basic skills.

Ways to meet the basic skills requirements:

  • Pass the WEST-B/SAT/ACT or equivalent approved test (reading, writing, and math).
  • Have earned an approved AA degree from a regionally accredited community college.
  • Have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited college/university.

If the basic skills requirements are not met, the following may be used as evidence of basic skills:

  • If candidates have attempted the reading test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two humanities or social science courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic reading skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the writing test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two college-level composition courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic writing skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the math test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in a credit earning college level math course or a UCORE [QUAN] designated course may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic mathematical skills.

NOTE: The goal of the Master in Teaching Elementary Certification (MIT-E) program is to prepare the best teachers possible. Therefore, we reserve the right to admit only the most highly qualified candidates. Meeting the following admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the program.

Application process

The application priority deadline is December 15.
The MIT Elementary Certification program begins once a year in early May.

The MIT-E application process is:

+ Complete the online Graduate School Application.

+ Submit a completed Master in Teaching Elementary Online Application.

+ Submit proof of Basic Skills and passing scores on NES in Elementary Education (Subtests 1 and 2) to Charlie Wagner.

* Application Portfolio will not be complete until a satisfactory transcript evaluation of prior content area course work has been concluded.

**  The Basic Skills requirement and NES in Elementary Education exams must be completed prior to application to the MIT program.

All MIT candidates must attempt the WEST-B exams (reading, writing, and math) or an equivalent test (SAT or ACT) and report an official score prior to admission to the program. If they do not achieve the passing score in any (or all) sections, they may opt to take the test again or request an alternative means of demonstrating of basic skills.

Ways to meet the basic skills requirements:

  • Pass the WEST-B/SAT/ACT or equivalent approved test (reading, writing, and math).
  • Have earned an approved AA degree from a regionally accredited community college.
  • Have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited college/university.

If the basic skills requirements are not met, the following may be used as evidence of basic skills:

  • If candidates have attempted the reading test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two humanities or social science courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic reading skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the writing test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two college-level composition courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic writing skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the math test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in a credit earning college level math course or a UCORE [QUAN] designated course may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic mathematical skills.

Program requirements

A minimum of 43 semester credits of course work, 14 semester credits of field experience, and a two-credit Master’s Project is required to complete the Master in Teaching Elementary (MIT-E) program.

Full-time students will complete the certification portion of the program in 20 months. One additional semester-long seminar to support students in completing the Master’ Project is necessary for completion of the Master degree. This seminar may be taken according to the student’s own timeline but may not be taken until successful completion of the student teaching experience. Students may request consideration for a part-time program but time to certification may be extended. Courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening with field experiences/internships occurring during the day only.

Program Guide

Learn more about the criteria for the Master’s in Teaching- Elementary Education Certification program.

Goals & Learning Outcomes

The MIT-E program has articulated learning goals and learning outcomes for its graduates. The following list the program goals, followed by the student learning outcomes.

GOAL 1: To prepare outstanding entry-level P-12 teachers with a focus on teacher research as a paradigm for practice. Successful graduates:

+ Use deep content and pedagogical knowledge to inform their teaching

+ Develop relevant, rigorous, and developmentally appropriate curricula

+ Modify curriculum and instruction based on the individual needs of their students

+ Use assessment of their students’ learning and their own teaching to inform future planning and teaching

+ Attend to the social and civic development of their students

+ Work respectfully and collaboratively with colleagues and community to ensure quality instructional programs and stewardship of public schools

GOAL 2: To guide students in their development as practitioner-researchers in P-12 school settings. Successful graduates:

+ Locate, analyze, and synthesize research literature, and apply that synthesis to problems of practice

+ Effectively communicate scholarly work through written, oral, and/or alternate formats

+ Skillfully inquire into areas of program-related interest

+ Develop scholarly habits of curiosity, inquiry, skepticism, and data-based decision making

GOAL 3: To establish itself as a highly successful program that is recognized for the quality of its graduates and its national visibility. The Program:

+ Attracts, secures, and retains high quality students

+ Graduates students who are satisfied with the professional preparation they have received

+ Graduates students who attain teaching licenses and other appropriate credentialing

+ Maintains an excellent on-time graduation record

+ Is delivered by a high quality graduate faculty that actively contributes to the program and that participates in scholarship that adds to the knowledge base of teacher and educator preparation

SECONDARY EDUCATION (GRADES 5-12)

Admission requirements

+ Completion of a Bachelor degree at an accredited institution

+ Transcript evaluation* demonstrating completion of prerequisite classes in your content area (Biology, Chemistry, English/Language Arts, History, Social Studies, or Physics). Each course must have a grade of “C” or higher with a combined minimum 2.5 GPA in all content area courses. Applications to the program will not be distributed prior to satisfactory completion of a transcript evaluation and required content coursework. Students are allowed to have two (2) content courses outstanding at the beginning of the program.

+ 3.0 GPA or higher as calculated by the Graduate School

+ Demonstration of Basic Skills in reading, writing, and math.  All applicants to the MIT Secondary program must have passing NES or WEST-E scores for your content area prior to applying to the MIT program (deadline December 15 of year of application).

All MIT candidates must attempt the WEST-B exams (reading, writing, and math) or an equivalent test (SAT or ACT) and report an official score prior to admission to the program. If they do not achieve the passing score in any (or all) sections, they may opt to take the test again or request an alternative means of demonstrating of basic skills.

Ways to meet the basic skills requirements:

  • Pass the WEST-B/SAT/ACT or equivalent approved test (reading, writing, and math).
  • Have earned an approved AA degree from a regionally accredited community college.
  • Have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited college/university.

If the basic skills requirements are not met, the following may be used as evidence of basic skills:

  • If candidates have attempted the reading test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two humanities or social science courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic reading skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the writing test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two college-level composition courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic writing skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the math test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in a credit earning college level math course or a UCORE [QUAN] designated course may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic mathematical skills.

* For a transcript evaluation, submit a Transcript Evaluation Request Form to Charlie Wagner along with all official transcripts that have courses that may fulfill the prerequisites. Include your mailing address, phone number, and email address. Evaluations may take four to six weeks so it is critical to plan accordingly.

Endorsements available at WSU Tri-Cities are:

NOTE: The goal of the Master in Teaching Secondary Certification (MIT-S) program is to prepare the best teachers possible. Therefore, we reserve the right to admit only the most highly qualified candidates. Meeting the following admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the program.

Application process

The application priority deadline is December, 15. The MIT Secondary Certification program begins once a year in early May.

The MIT-S application process is:

+ Submit a Transcript Evaluation Request Form to Charlie Wagner, along with official transcripts from all institutions attended.

+ Complete the online Graduate School Application.

+ Submit a completed Master in Teaching Secondary Online Application.

+ Submit proof of Basic Skills and passing NES or WEST-E scores ** to Charlie Wagner.

* Application Portfolio will not be complete until a satisfactory transcript evaluation of prior content area course work has been concluded.

**  The Basic Skills requirement  must be completed prior to application to the MIT program. The WEST-E/NES content-area exams must be completed prior to the start of the MIT program.

All MIT candidates must attempt the WEST-B exams (reading, writing, and math) or an equivalent test (SAT or ACT) and report an official score prior to admission to the program. If they do not achieve the passing score in any (or all) sections, they may opt to take the test again or request an alternative means of demonstrating of basic skills.

Ways to meet the basic skills requirements:

  • Pass the WEST-B/SAT/ACT or equivalent approved test (reading, writing, and math).
  • Have earned an approved AA degree from a regionally accredited community college.
  • Have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited college/university.

If the basic skills requirements are not met, the following may be used as evidence of basic skills:

  • If candidates have attempted the reading test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two humanities or social science courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic reading skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the writing test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in two college-level composition courses may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic writing skills.
  • If candidates have attempted the math test but not passed, a minimum grade of C in a credit earning college level math course or a UCORE [QUAN] designated course may be used to demonstrate evidence of basic mathematical skills.

Program requirements

A minimum of 33 semester credits of course work, 14 semester credits of field experience, and a two-credit Master’s Project is required to complete the Master in Teaching Secondary (MIT-S) program.

Full-time students will complete the certification portion of the program in 20 months. One additional semester-long seminar to support students in completing the Master’s Project is necessary for completion of the Master degree. This seminar may be taken according to the student’s own timeline but may not be taken until successful completion of the student teaching experience. Students may request consideration for a part-time program but time to certification may be extended. Courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening with field experiences/internships occurring during the day only.

Program Guide

Learn more about the criteria for the Master’s in Teaching Secondary Certification program.

Contact us

photo of Charlene Wagner
Charlene WagnerAcademic Support Staff, College of EducationFloyd 207A
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