History

HISTORY UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

History is the ongoing effort to understand the diverse people, institutions, and cultures of the past. Historical inquiry builds knowledge of past events and in doing so helps inform the decisions we make about our future. At WSU Tri-Cities, faculty specialize in many areas of historical research and teaching, including American west, religious, gender, race and culture, political, military, and diplomatic history.

Our History Department faculty are fully engaged both in research (they have published several books and numerous journal articles) and in the classroom.  Members of our department work closely with the Hanford History Project (http://www.hanfordhistory.com/) which is a great place for History students to enjoy hands-on learning as part of a History Internship.  Learn to read deeply, think about issues critically and write arguments persuasively.  Come join us in the Department of History and learn more about your community, your nation and your world! 

RELATED FIELDS

    • Business
    • Education
    • Government
    • Law
    • Politics
    • Public History

MAKE A MAJOR DISCOVERY…

Hover Box Element

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Hover Box Element

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Hover Box Element

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Hover Box Element

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

History Major Requirements

You may certify a major in history upon completing 24 credits with a GPA of 2.0 or higher. Because you will learn a broad range of transferable skills in this major, it works well as a double major or in conjunction with a minor in another department.

Required History Courses (36 HOURS)

  • HIST 300 Writing about History
  • HIST 469 Seminar in History
  • 6 hours of U.S. history
  • 6 hours of European history
  • 9 hours of non-Western/global history
  • 12-hour concentration (at least 6 hours at the 300- and 400-level) in the same or related disciplines

NOTE: At least 21 of the 36 hours in history courses must be at the 300 and 400 level.

Check out the WSU Catalog for major requirements.

History Minor Requirements

Minoring in a discipline outside your major field of study, allows you to focus elective credits, expand your perspective, and increase your skills. A minor will make you stand out to potential employers because it demonstrates an eagerness to learn and emphasizes your willingness to go above and beyond minimum expectations.

Students who have completed 60 semester hours may certify a minor. A minor in history requires 18 hours, 9 of which must be in 300-400-level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.

A general history minor requires:

  • 2.0 GPA
  • C or better grade in all courses
  • UCORE courses may be used toward a history minor

See what other minors and certificates are available at WSU Tri-Cities.

FRESHMAN

While the majority of students’ courses and credits are completed within the major, the UCORE curriculum provides courses that are the foundation basic skills that all WSU students must develop no matter their major.

The University Common Requirements (UCORE) is the center of the undergraduate curriculum and you will start taking these courses starting your first semester at WSU Tri-Cities. If you took AP, IB, or Running Start courses in high school, then you may already have met some of the requirements.

The UCORE curriculum is designed to be flexible enough to work for all majors. The program offers a wide variety of course choices and provides many individual pathways through the curriculum.

Not admitted yet? Talk with an Admissions Counselor to learn how easy it is to apply.

TRANSFER

Transfer students who have completed an approved Associate of Arts and Science (DTA) degree at a Washington or Oregon community college will have fulfilled most of the lower-division UCORE requirements. Because students have to also meet the College of Arts & Sciences requirements, some students must take additional courses in a foreign language in order to complete the degree. Otherwise, transfer students will have their transcripts evaluated for UCORE requirements.

Use the transfer credit equivalency guide to learn how your credits will transfer.

If you are currently enrolled at Columbia Basin College and intend to transfer to WSU Tri-Cities, then check out our Bridges Program that provides a direct academic path.

Students who have already earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, must complete a minimum of 30 credits of WSU coursework and fill the major requirements to earn a second degree. UCORE requirements are not required as they are met by coursework from the first bachelor’s degree.

Not admitted yet? Talk with an Admissions Counselor to learn how easy it is to apply.

STUDENT SUCCESS

Undergraduate advising is a partnership between you, your professional advisor, and your faculty mentor and it goes beyond course selection. Whether you plan to enter the workforce or continue on to earn an advanced degree, your academic advisors and professional mentors will guide you toward that goal. This holistic approach ensures that you are engaged in your academic plan, connected to the campus community and resources, and earn your degree as efficiently as possible.

Meet your advisor and get started on your academic path.

INTERNSHIPS

Liberal Arts Internship Programs offer an individualized, hands-on experience and is an ideal way to gain new skills and build your resume to stand out to potential employers.  Internships serve as a way to apply your classroom knowledge to real-world problem solving and projects.

Prior to completing an online internship packet [link], you are required to meet with your faculty supervisor and the department’s faculty internship coordinator to discuss your internship project.   Once your online internship packet is approved, the packet will be submitted to your Academic Advisor, who will provide you with permission to self-enroll in the course.

CAREERS

History majors develop research, critical thinking, and writing and verbal communication skills that are translatable to a number of careers.  Students who have graduated with a History degree from WSU Tri-Cities have gone on to careers in law; business; elementary, secondary, and higher education; public history; politics and government. 

Savanna Kresse

2020 History Graduate

I recently graduated with my BA in History and I am now working as a Policy Associate in the Planning and Policy division of the Washington Student Achievement Council. In my new role, I work on developing policy as it relates to expanding education in Washington State. I feel that I was prepared for this work by participating in interdisciplinary coursework.  In particular, I took an Independent Study course with Dr. Hanshew and Dr. Banks that allowed me to take what I learned in history courses and apply it to current policies and practices that impact our communities. It also showed me how current policies and practices have long histories that are pivotal to understanding how to create change for the better.

Headshot of Tracey Hanshew

Tracey Hanshew, Ph.D.

Scholarly Assistant Professor 
Department of History 

Dr. Hanshew specializes in women in the rural American West. She has a Master’s in Social Science from Syracuse University and completed her Ph.D. in History at Oklahoma State University. She has been at WSU Tri-Cities since 2017. Her publications include Oklahoma Rodeo Women, Arcadia Publishing-The History Press, February 2020. She is a contributing author to The American Yawp, Stanford University Press, January 2019. In 2018 she received a Visiting Scholar Fellowship from the Helmerich Center for American Research. She is the recipient of the Muriel H. Wright Award from the Oklahoma Historical Society for her article, “Rodeo in Oklahoma is Women’s Business: How Lucille Mulhall’s Fame Created Opportunity in Rodeo” published in the Chronicles of Oklahoma April 2015. She serves on the Advisory Board to Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture, 1900 to present, and serves as the Rural Women’s Studies Association memberships and communication coordinator for the United States.